25 books and authors that won both Hugo and Nebula awards

This is a list of the 25 books and authors and their works that have won both the Hugo and Nebula Awards (or the Ray Bradbury Award, given in place of the Nebula Award for Best Script since 2009), given annually to works of science fiction or fantasy literature. The Hugo Awards are voted on by science-fiction fans at the World Science Fiction Convention (Worldcon); the Nebula Awards—given by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (SFWA)—began in 1966, making that the first year joint winners were possible.

1966/1965 Dune by Frank Herbert

Franklin Patrick Herbert Jr. (October 8, 1920 – February 11, 1986) was an American science-fiction author best known for the 1965 novel Dune and its five sequels. Though he became famous for his novels, he also wrote short stories and worked as a newspaper journalist, photographer, book reviewer, ecological consultant, and lecturer.

1970/1969 The Left Hand of Darkness by Ursula K. Le Guin

Ursula Kroeber Le Guin (October 21, 1929 – January 22, 2018) was an American author best known for her works of speculative fiction, including science fiction works set in her Hainish universe, and the Earthsea fantasy series. She was first published in 1959, and her literary career spanned nearly sixty years, yielding more than twenty novels and over a hundred short stories, in addition to poetry, literary criticism, translations, and children’s books. Frequently described as an author of science fiction, Le Guin has also been called a “major voice in American Letters”, and herself said she would prefer to be known as an “American novelist”.

1971/1970 Ringworld by Larry Niven

Laurence van Cott Niven (born April 30, 1938) is an American science fiction writer. His best-known works are Ringworld (1970), which received Hugo, Locus, Ditmar, and Nebula awards, and The Mote in God’s Eye (1974). The Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America named him the 2015 recipient of the Damon Knight Memorial Grand Master Award. His work is primarily hard science fiction, using big science concepts and theoretical physics. It also often includes elements of detective fiction and adventure stories. His fantasy includes the series The Magic Goes Away, rational fantasy dealing with magic as a non-renewable resource.

1973/1972 The Gods Themselves by Isaac Asimov

Isaac Asimov (January 2, 1920 – April 6, 1992) was an American writer and professor of biochemistry at Boston University. He was known for his works of science fiction and popular science. Asimov was a prolific writer who wrote or edited more than 500 books and an estimated 90,000 letters and postcards. His books have been published in 9 of the 10 major categories of the Dewey Decimal Classification.

1974/1973 Rendezvous with Rama by Arthur C. Clarke

Sir Arthur Charles Clarke CBE FRAS (16 December 1917 – 19 March 2008) was a British science fiction writer, science writer and futurist, inventor, undersea explorer, and television series host.

1975/1974 The Dispossessed by Ursula K. Le Guin

This is the second time Ursula K. Le Guin wins both Hugo and Nebula awards, becoming the first woman to do so.

1976/1975 The Forever War by Joe Haldeman

Joe William Haldeman (born June 9, 1943) is an American science fiction author. He is best known for his novel The Forever War (1974). That novel, and other of his works, including The Hemingway Hoax (1991) and Forever Peace (1997), have won major science fiction awards, including the Hugo Award and Nebula Award.

1978/1977 Gateway by Frederik Pohl

Frederik George Pohl Jr. (November 26, 1919 – September 2, 2013) was an American science-fiction writer, editor, and fan, with a career spanning more than 75 years—from his first published work, the 1937 poem “Elegy to a Dead Satellite: Luna”, to the 2011 novel All the Lives He Led and articles and essays published in 2012.

1979/1978 Dreamsnake by Vonda McIntyre

Vonda Neel McIntyre (August 28, 1948 – April 1, 2019) was an American science fiction author.

1980/1979 The Fountains of Paradise by Arthur C. Clarke

Arthur C. Clarke is the second author on this list to win both awards, following Ursula K. Le Guin.

1984/1983 Startide Rising by David Brin

Glen David Brin (born October 6, 1950) is an American scientist and author of science fiction. He has received the Hugo, Locus, Campbell and Nebula Awards. His novel The Postman was adapted as a feature film and starred Kevin Costner in 1997. Brin’s nonfiction book The Transparent Society won the Freedom of Speech Award of the American Library Association and the McGannon Communication Award.

1985/1984 Neuromancer by William Gibson

William Ford Gibson (born March 17, 1948) is an American-Canadian speculative fiction writer and essayist widely credited with pioneering the science fiction subgenre known as cyberpunk. Beginning his writing career in the late 1970s, his early works were noir, near-future stories that explored the effects of technology, cybernetics, and computer networks on humans—a “combination of lowlife and high tech”—and helped to create an iconography for the information age before the ubiquity of the Internet in the 1990s. Gibson notably coined the term “cyberspace” for “widespread, interconnected digital technology” in his short story “Burning Chrome” (1982), and later popularized the concept in his acclaimed debut novel Neuromancer (1984). These early works of Gibson’s have been credited with “renovating” science fiction literature in the 1980s.

1986/1985 Ender’s Game by Orson Scott Card
1987/1986 Speaker for the Dead by Orson Scott Card

Orson Scott Card (born August 24, 1951) is an American novelist, critic, public speaker, essayist, and columnist. He writes in several genres but is known best for his science fiction. His novel Ender’s Game (1985) and its sequel, Speaker for the Dead (1986), both won Hugo and Nebula Awards, making Card the only author to win the two top American prizes in science fiction literature in consecutive years. A feature film adaptation of Ender’s Game, which Card co-produced, was released in 2013. Card is also the author of the Locus Fantasy Award-winning series The Tales of Alvin Maker (1987–2003).

1993/1992 Doomsday Book by Connie Willis

Constance Elaine Trimmer Willis (born December 31, 1945), commonly known as Connie Willis, is an American science fiction and fantasy writer. She has won eleven Hugo Awards and seven Nebula Awards for particular works—more major SF awards than any other writer—most recently the “Best Novel” Hugo and Nebula Awards for Blackout/All Clear (2010). She was inducted by the Science Fiction Hall of Fame in 2009 and the Science Fiction Writers of America named her its 28th SFWA Grand Master in 2011.

1998 Forever Peace by Joe Haldeman

Haldeman’s second entry in this list, Forever Peace won the Hugo Award, the Nebula Award, the John W. Campbell Memorial Award and was a Locus Award nominee all in the same year.

2002/2003 American Gods by Neil Gaiman

Neil Richard MacKinnon Gaiman (born Neil Richard Gaiman, 10 November 1960) is an English author of short fiction, novels, comic books, graphic novels, nonfiction, audio theatre, and films. His works include the comic book series The Sandman and novels Stardust, American Gods, Coraline, and The Graveyard Book. He has won numerous awards, including the Hugo, Nebula, and Bram Stoker awards, as well as the Newbery and Carnegie medals. He is the first author to win both the Newbery and the Carnegie medals for the same work, The Graveyard Book (2008). In 2013, The Ocean at the End of the Lane was voted Book of the Year in the British National Book Awards.

2004 Paladin of Souls by Lois McMaster Bujold

Lois McMaster Bujold (born November 2, 1949) is an American speculative fiction writer. She is one of the most acclaimed writers in her field, having won the Hugo Award for best novel four times, matching Robert A. Heinlein’s record (not counting his Retro Hugos). Her novella “The Mountains of Mourning” won both the Hugo Award and Nebula Award. In the fantasy genre, The Curse of Chalion won the Mythopoeic Award for Adult Literature and was nominated for the 2002 World Fantasy Award for best novel, and both her fourth Hugo Award and second Nebula Award were for Paladin of Souls. In 2011 she was awarded the Skylark Award. In 2013 she was awarded the Forry Award for Lifetime Achievement, named for Forrest J. Ackerman, by the Los Angeles Science Fantasy Society. She has won two Hugo Awards for Best Series, in 2017 for the Vorkosigan Saga and in 2018 for the Chalion series. The Science Fiction Writers of America named her its 36th SFWA Grand Master in 2019.

2008/2007 The Yiddish Policemen’s Union by Michael Chabon

Michael Chabon (born May 24, 1963) is an American novelist, screenwriter, columnist and short story writer.

Chabon’s first novel, The Mysteries of Pittsburgh (1988), was published when he was 25. He followed it with Wonder Boys (1995), and two short-story collections. In 2000, Chabon published The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay, a novel that John Leonard, in a 2007 review of a later novel, called Chabon’s magnum opus. It received the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction in 2001.

2010/2009 The Windup Girl by Paolo Bacigalupi

Paolo Tadini Bacigalupi (born August 6, 1972 in Paonia, Colorado) is an American science fiction and fantasy writer. He has won the Hugo, Nebula, John. W. Campbell, Compton Crook, Theodore Sturgeon, and Michael L. Printz awards, and has been nominated for the National Book Award. His fiction has appeared in The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, Asimov’s Science Fiction, and the environmental journal High Country News. Nonfiction essays of his have appeared in Salon.com and High Country News, and have been syndicated in newspapers, including the Idaho Statesman, the Albuquerque Journal, and the Salt Lake Tribune.

2011/2010 Blackout/All Clear by Connie Willis

Several of her works feature time travel by history students at a faculty of the future University of Oxford—sometimes called the Time Travel series. They are the short story “Fire Watch” (1982, also in several anthologies and the 1985 collection of the same name), the novels Doomsday Book and To Say Nothing of the Dog (1992 and 1997), as well as the two-part novel Blackout/All Clear (2010). All four won the annual Hugo Award but Doomsday Book and Blackout/All Clear won both the Hugo and Nebula Awards.

2012/2011 Among Others by Jo Walton

Jo Walton (born December 1, 1964) is a Welsh-Canadian fantasy and science fiction writer and poet. She won the John W. Campbell Award for Best New Writer in 2002 and the World Fantasy award for her novel Tooth and Claw in 2004. Her novel Ha’penny was a co-winner of the 2008 Prometheus Award. Her novel Lifelode won the 2010 Mythopoeic Award. Her novel Among Others won the 2011 Nebula Award for Best Novel and the 2012 Hugo Award for Best Novel; Among Others is one of only seven novels to have been nominated for the Hugo Award, Nebula Award, and World Fantasy Award.

2014/2013 Ancillary Justice by Ann Leckie

Ann Leckie (born 1966) is an American author of science fiction and fantasy. Her 2013 debut novel Ancillary Justice, in part about artificial consciousness and gender-blindness, won the 2014 Hugo Award for “Best Novel”, as well as the Nebula Award, the Arthur C. Clarke Award, and the BSFA Award. The sequels, Ancillary Sword and Ancillary Mercy, each won the Locus Award and were nominated for the Nebula Award. Provenance, published in 2017, is also set in the Imperial Radch universe. Leckie’s first fantasy novel, The Raven Tower, was published in February 2019.

2018/2017 The Stone Sky by N. K. Jemisin

Nora K. Jemisin (born September 19, 1972) is an American science fiction and fantasy writer and a psychologist. Her fiction explores a wide variety of themes, including cultural conflict and oppression. She has won several awards for her work, including the Locus Award. As of her August 2018 win, the three books of her Broken Earth series have made her the only author to have won the Hugo Award for Best Novel in three consecutive years.

2019/2018 The Calculating Stars, by Mary Robinette Kowal

Mary Robinette Kowal (born February 8, 1969 as Mary Robinette Harrison) is an American author and puppeteer.

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